Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

of

India : Unity in diversity Slide 1 India : Unity in diversity Slide 2 India : Unity in diversity Slide 3 India : Unity in diversity Slide 4 India : Unity in diversity Slide 5 India : Unity in diversity Slide 6 India : Unity in diversity Slide 7 India : Unity in diversity Slide 8 India : Unity in diversity Slide 9 India : Unity in diversity Slide 10 India : Unity in diversity Slide 11 India : Unity in diversity Slide 12 India : Unity in diversity Slide 13 India : Unity in diversity Slide 14 India : Unity in diversity Slide 15 India : Unity in diversity Slide 16 India : Unity in diversity Slide 17 India : Unity in diversity Slide 18 India : Unity in diversity Slide 19 India : Unity in diversity Slide 20 India : Unity in diversity Slide 21 India : Unity in diversity Slide 22 India : Unity in diversity Slide 23 India : Unity in diversity Slide 24 India : Unity in diversity Slide 25 India : Unity in diversity Slide 26 India : Unity in diversity Slide 27 India : Unity in diversity Slide 28 India : Unity in diversity Slide 29 India : Unity in diversity Slide 30 India : Unity in diversity Slide 31 India : Unity in diversity Slide 32 India : Unity in diversity Slide 33 India : Unity in diversity Slide 34
Upcoming SlideShare
What to Upload to SlideShare
Next

0 Likes

Share

India : Unity in diversity

Multiculturalism in India
India : Unity in diversity

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all
  • Be the first to like this

India : Unity in diversity

  1. 1. NameetaSahare S.P. Mandali’sTilakCollegeofEducation,Pune411030
  2. 2. Bharat= India  Pressing hands together with a smile to greet Namaste /Namaskar a common cultural practice in India
  3. 3. Indian Cultural Diversity The Indian culture has never been rigid and that's why it's surviving with pride in the modern era. It timely imbibes the qualities of various other cultures and comes out as a contemporary and acceptable tradition.
  4. 4. Indian culture is one of the oldest & unique. Few countries in the world have such an ancient & diverse culture as India's. In India, there is an amazing cultural diversity throughout the country. The South, North, and Northeast have their own distinct cultures & almost every state has carved its own cultural niche. Its physical, religious and racial variety is as immense as its linguistic diversity. Underneath this diversity lies the continuity of Indian civilization and social structure from the very earliest times until the present day. India is a vast country with a variety of geographical features & climatic conditions.
  5. 5. Most tourists who come to India are amazed by personally observing the Indian culture. Since India is vastly populated, its perpetual cultural diversity is amazingly spread out. Still one thing that is common in these millions of people their love for the culture. India is the world’s largest democracy. Multiculturalism relates to communities containing multiple cultures. What makes Indian multiculturalism and multicultural education unique is the fact that diversity is considered a defining feature of both Indian identity and Indian democracy. India is the best place in the world to see the different cultures from modern to ancient and find the similarities in these diversified cultures. Multiculturalism
  6. 6. Indian Cultural Diversity  On the world stage, either through international film festivals or through beauty pageants, India regularly displays its talent and culture. The flexibility & movement with time has made Indian Culture fashionable & acceptable too.
  7. 7. Multicultural education  Multicultural education is a philosophical concept built on the ideals of freedom, justice, equality, equity, and human dignity  Multicultural education is a process that permeates all aspects of school practices, policies and organization as a means to ensure the highest levels of academic achievement for all students.  It helps students develop a positive self-concept by providing knowledge about the histories, cultures, and contributions of diverse groups….Let’s have glimpses of history & culture
  8. 8. India is the second richest centre of architectural heritage in the world after Europe and may be no single country of the world can match it in this respect.
  9. 9. Ajanta & ElloraCaves: Chaitya griha, kailasnath & Sanctuary - Maharashtra. One of the most impressive rock-cut architectural monuments in the world, built between 550 - 1000 AD. 34 caves contain Buddhist, Hindu and Jain sanctuaries - possibly the most splendid rock-cut cave in world.
  10. 10. Languages of India According to Ethnologue, India is considered to be the home to 398 languages out of which 11 have been reported extinct. In India, some 1652 dialects were recorded in a census made in 1961. Another census was initiated way back 2001 and it showed that for more than half a million inhabitants, there are 29 languages being spoken. This is why Indian language translation is a tough one. Dialects in India vary depending on demographic location. Although the constitution of India stipulates that the main language of the country is Hindi in Devanagari script, languages of native tongues are still very much alive.
  11. 11. Languages of India: Water (vann) = Paani, jal ,tani,neer,neeru,aab Urdu Punjabi Rajasthani Sanskrit-Hindi Gujarati Marathi Konkani Kannada Telagu-Tamil Malayalam Oriya Bengali Assamese Manipuri
  12. 12. Agriculture & Food Main crops: rice, wheat, tea, sugar cane, spices  Rice & chapatti  Vegetables  Seafood  Meat  Masala-spices  Tea-common drink
  13. 13. ‘FESTIVALS’
  14. 14. India is undoubtedly, a land of festivals. There are festivals for every season, for every legend & myth, every region and every religious place. Festivals of India are characterized by colour, enthusiasm, feasts and a variety of prayers and rituals. Dance and music are essential ingredients. Some are exclusive to certain communities & religions while others have a national & secular character about them. Indian festivals are celebrated according to the solar and lunar calendars. Consequently, dates & months may vary accordingly. In India, festivals are marked by a warmth of participation. Color and festivity also provide an occasion for shopping when overnight small markets appear from nowhere. IndianFestivals
  15. 15. Someone once remarked that in India, there is a festival on every day of the year. There are innumerable national, regional, local, religious, seasonal and social festivities that give credence to this statement. This is not surprising considering the innumerable gods, goddesses, saints, gurus and prophets who are worshipped in India. Throughout India, there are dozens of festivals and celebrations that take place celebrating different religious and cultural occasions. The numerous and varied festivals that are held throughout the year offer a unique way of seeing Indian culture at its best. Indian Festivals
  16. 16. Some of the festivals celebrated in India….
  17. 17. Makar Sankranti  Makar Sankranti is a harvest festival. It marks the transition of the Sun into the zodiac sign of Makara rashi (Capricorn) on its celestial path.  This festival also comes as Thanksgiving to Mother Nature for an abundance of crops, well being and prosperity. The festivities include sweets made of jaggery, green gram and sesame.The festivals is known as Khichri in UP, Sakat in Haryana and Punjab, Sukarat in MP, Bhogali Bihu in Assam and West Bengal, Pongal in Tamil Nadu, Sankranti in Andhra and Karnataka and Uttarayan in Rajasthan and Gujarat.
  18. 18. Diwali is certainly the biggest and the brightest of all Hindu festivals. Deepavali in Sanskrit is ‘a row of lamps’. It is a festival of lights symbolizing the victory of righteousness and the lifting of spiritual darkness. It celebrates the victory of good over evil - and the glory of light. This festival commemorates Lord Rama's return to his kingdom Ayodhya after completing his 14-year exile. Diwali
  19. 19. Holi Holi is celebrated all over India with color, music, dance and bonfires. It marks the beginning of summer. It also celebrates the end of cold and hardship, and the successful harvest of the winter crop. People throw colored water and powders (gulal and kumkum) at each other and make merry. Singing and dancing add to the gaiety of the occasion. The exuberant display of colors symbolizes the advent of a colorful and prosperous spring season.
  20. 20. Ganesh Chaturthi Ganesh Chaturthi is the Hindu festival celebrated on the birthday of Lord Ganesha, the son of Shiva and Parvati. Ganesha is widely worshipped as the god of wisdom, prosperity and good fortune and traditionally invoked at the beginning of any new venture or at the start of travel. On the last day of worship the idol is taken out in a colourful and musical procession to be immersed traditionally at a beach. People bring home idols of Lord Ganesha and celebrate the festival by worshiping the Lord in a special way for a day and a half, 5 days, 7 days or 11 days
  21. 21. Eid Eid also called Feast of Breaking the Fast, the Sugar Feast, the Sweet Festival is an important religious holiday celebrated by Muslims worldwide that marks the end of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month of fasting. At the end of Ramadan, Muslims celebrate Eid Al-Fitr. The entire community comes together for special prayers and to congratulate each other. The traditional Eid greeting is Eid Mubarak, and it is frequently followed by a formal embrace. Eid
  22. 22. Dussehra/ Durga Pooja The name Dussehra is derived from Sanskrit Dasha- hara literally means removal of ten referring to Lord Rama’s victory over the ten-headed demon king Ravana. The day also marks the victory of Goddess Durga over the demons . They also hold outdoor fairs (melas) and large parades with effigies of Ravana ( king of ancient Sri Lanka). The effigies are burnt on bonfires in the evening. Dussehra is the culmination of the Navaratri festival.
  23. 23. Baisakhi Baisakhi is a festival celebrated across the northern Indian subcontinent, especially in the Punjab region by the Sikh nation. For the Sikh community this festival commemorates the establishment of the Khalsa. This is the time when harvest is gathered in and the farmer exults in the fulfillment of his year's hard work. The fields can be seen full of nature's bounty. Dressed in their typical folk attire, both men and women, celebrate the day with Bhangra and Gidda. On Baisakhi day, water is drawn from all the sacred rivers of India and poured in to the huge tank surrounding the golden temple. Many fairs in the Punjab are held near the tombs and shrines of spiritual gurus. These fairs must have originated in a spirit of devotion to those saints and sages.
  24. 24. & Dance
  25. 25.  Clothing in India varies from region to region depending on the ethnicity, geography, climate and cultural traditions of the people of that region.  Women wear a sari, a long sheet of colourful cloth, (5m to 7m)draped over a fancy blouse  Churidar, dupatta, KharaDupatta, gamchha, kurta, mundum, sherwani are among other clothes.
  26. 26. Paithani sarees - Handwoven Pure silk saree with golden thread. Bandhani is a type of tie-dye practiced mainly in the states of Rajasthan and Gujarat. The technique involves dyeing a fabric which is tied tightly with a thread at several points,thus producing a variety of patterns like Leheriya, Mothra, Ekdali and Shikari depending on the manner in which the cloth is tied
  27. 27. Essentially, multicultural education is about social change through education. It requires deep and critical thinking, imagination, and commitment to another tomorrow, inclusive of the wealth of all of our stories and peoples.  Schools must find ways to respect the diversity of their students as well as help to create a unified nation-state to which all of the nation's citizens have allegiance.  Multicultural education is another aspect of the continuous human journey toward justice and pushes us toward the fulfilment of the promises of democracy
  28. 28. India today is unfolding a story of a billion plus people, or more precisely, one sixth of the world’s population, on a big move as India's large and complex systems rapidly moving top-down and the country emerge as one of the fastest growing economies of the world. India is probable the only country in the world where people belonging to different religions, castes and creeds, speaking different languages, having different cultures, different modes of living, different clothing, different food habits, worshiping different gods and deity live together in harmony and believe to be the children of one mother-MOTHER INDIA. Jai Hind! Jai Bharat!
  29. 29. Thank You References: amazon.de/Surya-Namaskar-Kai-Franz Banks, J. A. (1997a). Teaching strategies for ethnic studies. (6th edition). Boston: Allyn and Bacon. Banks, J. A. (1997b). Multicultural education: Characteristics and goals. Banks, J. A Encyclopedia of diversity in Education Reva Joshee, India, Multicultural Education https://creationcenter.org/the-power-of-the-seed-mantra-om knowledge.sagepub.com https://www.herzindagi.com/diary/most-famous-gurudwaras-in-india economictimes.Indiatimes.com https://www.rediff.com/getahead/report https://www.shutterstock.com www.wondermondo.com wikipedia.org

Multiculturalism in India India : Unity in diversity

Views

Total views

113

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

0

Actions

Downloads

0

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

0

×