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Understanding the Marketing Technology Landscape

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Marketing technology is a vast field that crosses boundaries across multiple parts of an organization. Despite the software focus, it is essential to link marketing activities to specific business strategies and results.

This presentation was given at the CRM Evolution conference in NYC, in August 2015. The presenters were Michael Krigsman and Scott Brinker.

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Understanding the Marketing Technology Landscape

  1. 1. Michael Krigsman Founder @mkrigsman mkrigsman@cxotalk.com Scott Brinker: Author & Editor @chiefmartec sjbrinker@gmail.com Understanding the Marketing Technology Landscape
  2. 2. Marketing Technology in Context What, Why, How
  3. 3. You are here. Marketing Technology is a Vast Space
  4. 4. Source: Signal, September 2014 Evolving rapidly Evolving at light speed Has been growing steadilyHas evolved slightlyNot much
  5. 5. Analytics software affects our perceptions. Marketing automation software affects our processes. Social media software affects our engagement strategy. Marketing apps software affects our touchpoints. CRM software, by definition, affects our relationships.
  6. 6. Does Marketing Technology Help Us Sell?
  7. 7. Relationship Drives Revenue
  8. 8. Most companies think they are customer-focused
  9. 9. Do Customers Agree? No. Delivery Gap
  10. 10. Talk is cheap
  11. 11. Traditional Tools / CRM are for Management Yuck
  12. 12. .
  13. 13. . CRM Failure Rates Gartner 2001: 50% Butler Group 2002: 70% Selling Power, CSO Forum 2002: 69.3% AMR Research 2005: 18% AMR Research 2006: 31% AMR Research 2007: 29% Forrester Research 2009: 47%
  14. 14. Digital Empowers the Individual
  15. 15. Digital: Transparent Goodness Clarity on customer behavior and actions Brand openness and availability
  16. 16. Meg Bear Group Vice President “Interaction with customers that feels much more personalized because it’s direct and targeted. While simultaneously being much more material to your business.”
  17. 17. Digital Expectations Tailored content Ongoing relationship Efficiency
  18. 18. Larry Augustin CEO “Engagement is a measure of customer satisfaction.”
  19. 19. Engagement Makes Money!!! Digital influence on retail sales (physical stores)
  20. 20. Marketer Marketing Software Web Services Client Software Customer Experience
  21. 21. What’s a marketer to do?
  22. 22. MarTech: Team Sport Marketing experts Creative types Technologists and IT
  23. 23. Marketing Expertise TechnologyExpertise Old School Marketers OldSchool IT&Engineers
  24. 24. Marketing Expertise TechnologyExpertise Old School Marketers New School: Marketing Technologists Creative Technologists Growth Hackers Chief Digital Officers Data Scientists OldSchool IT&Engineers
  25. 25. Adapt or Die
  26. 26. Worldwide Marketing Software Forecast 2014-2018 Source: IDC $20.2 billion $32.4 billion
  27. 27. CMO: I’m ready to take over our IT spend! CIO: Why me? By 2017 the CMO will spend more on IT than the CIO. – Gartner
  28. 28. Kim Stevenson CIO “There are no IT projects. They are all business projects.”
  29. 29. Are You Marketing or Technolog y? 79 percent Have own technology budget 27 percent of tech spend Outside of IT 43 percent Technology development is too slow CMO Survey
  30. 30. Mission: Listen and Serve
  31. 31. Create Loyalty
  32. 32. 3 Empower customer relationships 2 Amplify the customer’s voice 1 Listen to the customer The Marketing Technologist’s Opportunity 4 Build loyalty and engagement
  33. 33. MarTech Magnifies Your Impact 10x

Editor's Notes

  • crass
  • Marketer’s nirvana – doesn’t get any better than custs telling you just what they want your brand to provide

    Competitve edge

    Social selling is a two-way street


    Social selling helps us create customers that are happy and love us. The penguins are happy, they got their cupcakes.

    Relationship w custs so they fall in love w our brands

    Truly dev brand love and loyalty- brand advocate

    MARKETERS ARE IN CONTROL OF SOCIAL SELLING


    If not even a cust, more open and willing to give feedback and impact image I social channels

    Helpful and of service to the customer

    Build relationships and loyalty


    Social selling not about selling but helping
    Social review site, trustradius, g2crowd
    Gives user voice to speak about a brand
    How marketeers build the relationship

    Transparency

    Social media, oppty for mkters to have an authentic conversation w custs


    TRUST ARISING OUT OF SOCIAL

    Identify potential buyers
    Intersect w influenvcers
    Enaging honestly

    USE BOXES – using examples to show the key aspect of social selling
  • http://www.bain.com/bainweb/pdfs/cms/hottopics/closingdeliverygap.pdf



  • http://media.photobucket.com/image/horse%20talking/QUICK07/mister_ed_talking_horse.jpg
  • (It’s a management tool Doesn’t help customers Sales people hate it) Traditional tools are changing
  • The truth is, failure is a big problem with CRM projects, and it has been for quite a while. Depending on how you define failure and who’s doing the counting, the most conservative failure rate is around 18% and a broader definition will give a rate of maybe 70%. If we split the difference and call the failure rate 30%-40%, that’s still pretty terrible. Interestingly, these rates of failure seem to match those for traditional IT projects.

    When looking at failure statistics, it’s important to bear in mind that studies often measure different things. For example, they may define CRM differently, or measure degree of satisfaction rather than failure itself. The term failure doesn’t always have a precise meaning, so be careful when comparing numbers from year to year. Even so, there’s clearly a great deal of unhappiness with CRM out there.







    Gray areas – failure is not black or white.







    Source: CRM at the speed of Light, 3rd edition, page 3

    http://books.google.com/books?id=vLOKDlGDI2sC&pg=PA3&lpg=PA3&dq=2002+butler+group+crm+failure&source=bl&ots=vWRl3-EfUK&sig=cIjruyLNseXjix3OxFctIzGahjg&hl=en&ei=u7FkSv69OoPSMqHw5PcB&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4

    http://www.amrresearch.com/Content/View.asp?pmillid=20784

  • The truth is, failure is a big problem with CRM projects, and it has been for quite a while. Depending on how you define failure and who’s doing the counting, the most conservative failure rate is around 18% and a broader definition will give a rate of maybe 70%. If we split the difference and call the failure rate 30%-40%, that’s still pretty terrible. Interestingly, these rates of failure seem to match those for traditional IT projects.

    When looking at failure statistics, it’s important to bear in mind that studies often measure different things. For example, they may define CRM differently, or measure degree of satisfaction rather than failure itself. The term failure doesn’t always have a precise meaning, so be careful when comparing numbers from year to year. Even so, there’s clearly a great deal of unhappiness with CRM out there.







    Gray areas – failure is not black or white.







    Source: CRM at the speed of Light, 3rd edition, page 3

    http://books.google.com/books?id=vLOKDlGDI2sC&pg=PA3&lpg=PA3&dq=2002+butler+group+crm+failure&source=bl&ots=vWRl3-EfUK&sig=cIjruyLNseXjix3OxFctIzGahjg&hl=en&ei=u7FkSv69OoPSMqHw5PcB&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4

    http://www.amrresearch.com/Content/View.asp?pmillid=20784

  • Digital Changes Everything (Richness of data Tools for personalization Better understand customers Make life easier for them)
  • http://www.zdnet.com/article/digital-transformation-can-save-the-cio/ - Deloitte
    Forrester customer experience
  • http://www.zdnet.com/article/deloitte-digital-chief-marketing-officers-invading-it-turf/ - Deloitte Digital
  • ×