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How to Make Setting B2B Appointments Easy

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Setting B2B appointments can be tough. Once you do finally get a prospect on the phone, you only have a couple of minutes to work with and it can sometimes be a hostile environment.

But don’t worry as we have developed a B2B appointment setting sales methodology that not only makes this process easier, it will also produce better results. We will outline how this process works on our next webinar “How to Make Setting B2B Appointments Easy” and you will also receive an ebook under the same name when you register.

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How to Make Setting B2B Appointments Easy

  1. 1. How to Make B2B Appointment Setting Easy Michael Halper Founder and CEO SalesScripter
  2. 2. Not All Fluff
  3. 3. Not too Complex
  4. 4. Consultative Selling Approach
  5. 5. Not Pushy and Aggressive
  6. 6. Sound More Like a Business Person than a Salesperson
  7. 7. Core Concepts Understand the Prospect • Extremely busy • Gets a lot of sales calls • Likely not in buying mode • Guard will be at a medium level
  8. 8. Step 1 – Focus on the Right Goal You Always Have Two Goals 1. Ultimate Goal: Close the sale, sell the product, get a new client 2. Immediate Goal: Advance prospect to next stage of the sales process Initial Contact (First time to speak) Cold Call Inbound Call Email Event 2 to 5 minutes 80% on prospect 20% on you First Conversation (Appointment/Meeting) Phone Call Face-to-Face Discovery 20 to 30 minutes 50% on prospect 50% on you First Meeting (Presentation) Discovery Presentation Demonstration 1 to 2 hours 20% on prospect 80% on youFull training module on YouTube - Mapping Out Your Ideal Sales Process
  9. 9. Step 1 – Focus on the Right Goal Avoid the Instant Appointment • When the cold call progresses to a decent conversation • You will usually have more time and attention in a scheduled appointment • If you progress into a conversation, you will miss an opportunity to close for a meeting Initial Contact (First time to speak) Cold Call Inbound Call Email Event 2 to 5 minutes 80% on prospect 20% on you First Conversation (Appointment/Meeting) Phone Call Face-to-Face Discovery 20 to 30 minutes 50% on prospect 50% on you First Meeting (Presentation) Discovery Presentation Demonstration 1 to 2 hours 20% on prospect 80% on you
  10. 10. Step 1 – Focus on the Right Goal Make Objections Invalid These objections don’t even make sense when you are trying to sell the conversation: – I am not interested – We already use someone today – We don’t have budget to spend – We aren’t making any changes right now Initial Contact (First time to speak) Cold Call Inbound Call Email Event 2 to 5 minutes 80% on prospect 20% on you First Conversation (Appointment/Meeting) Phone Call Face-to-Face Discovery 20 to 30 minutes 50% on prospect 50% on you First Meeting (Presentation) Discovery Presentation Demonstration 1 to 2 hours 20% on prospect 80% on youFull training module on YouTube – How to Consistently Get Around Sales Objection
  11. 11. Step 2 – Confirm Availability Is the Prospect in the Middle of Anything? Opening the call by checking to see if you have caught the prospect in the middle of anything. – Determine if normal busy or crazy busy – “Have I caught you in the middle of anything?” – Buys you 2 to 5 minutes – Build rapports – Creates an impression of familiarity
  12. 12. Step 3 – Elevator Pitch Grab the Prospect’s Attention One or two sentences that communicate how you help your clients. Here are three options: 1. Share a value statement 2. Share examples of common problems 3. Share a quick client example Full training module on YouTube – Building a Value Proposition that Generates Leads
  13. 13. Step 4 – Soft Disqualify Decrease the Prospect’s Guard Perform a soft takeaway right after your elevator pitch. “I am not sure if we are a good fit for you.” “I am not sure if you all need what we provide.” “I am not sure you are the right person to speak with.” Full training module on YouTube - How to Perform the Perfect Takeaway
  14. 14. Step 5 - Pre-Qualify Ask a Couple of Questions Have a couple of questions as the central piece and purpose of your call. – Makes call more conversational – Extracts valuable information – Pre-qualifies to determine if it makes sense to keep talking Full training module on YouTube – Sell More by Screening the Good Prospects from Bad
  15. 15. Step 5 - Pre-Qualify Building Your Questions Here is a step-by-step process that you can use to build an optimum list of questions: 1. Identify the product you ultimately want to sell 2. Identify the benefits it offers the buyer 3. Identify the pain point that the benefit fixes 4. Compose one or two question for each pain point Full training module on YouTube – Sell More by Screening the Good Prospects from Bad
  16. 16. Step 6 – Share Common Problems Is the Prospect Having Challenges? • Share some examples of problems that you help to resolve, minimize, or avoid • Goal is to get some sort of acknowledgement that there is a concern or uncertainty Full training module on YouTube – How to Use Prospect Pain to Generate Leads
  17. 17. Step 7 – Share Brief Company and Product Info (Pre-Close Step) Build Enough Interest to Close • Product details • Outline benefits • Communicate ROI • Explain differentiation • Share client story • Paint a picture of the future state • Discuss impacts of doing nothing • Share company facts
  18. 18. Step 8 – Close Ask for the Appointment If you have done everything else, it should be very easy and reasonable to ask for the meeting. – Grab their attention – Decrease their guard – Identify that they have a need or concern – Communicate how you can help – Build a little interest Full training module on YouTube – How to Immediately Become a Better Closer
  19. 19. Call Blueprint Target Prospect Introduction “Hello Mary, this is Michael Halper, calling from SalesScripter. Have I caught you in the middle of anything?” Target Prospect Introduction Elevator Pitch Qualifying Questions Common Pain Examples Brief Company and Product Info Close Disqualify Statement
  20. 20. Call Blueprint Elevator Pitch Great. The Purpose of my call is that - (Choose one of below) • We help Sales Managers to get their sales people saying the best possible sales pitch and asking the right questions. • We help Sales Managers to shorten the amount of time that it takes to train new salespeople. • We help Sales Managers to improve sales performance for the entire sales team. • We help Sales Managers to decrease sales staff turnover. • We help Sales Managers to get under-performing on the right track. • We help Sales Managers to simplify training and onboarding for the sales resources. Target Prospect Introduction Elevator Pitch Qualifying Questions Common Pain Examples Brief Company and Product Info Close Disqualify Statement
  21. 21. Call Blueprint Disqualify Statement (Choose one of the following) • I actually don't know if you need what our services provide so I just had a question or two. • I actually don't know if you are a good fit for what we provide so I just had a question or two. • I don't know if you are the right person to speak with but I have just a couple of questions. Target Prospect Introduction Elevator Pitch Qualifying Questions Common Pain Examples Brief Company and Product Info Close Disqualify Statement
  22. 22. Call Blueprint Qualifying Questions • How confident are you that all of your sales resources are asking the right questions when talking with prospects? • How concerned are you about the amount of time it takes to get new sales hires ramped up and performing? How long on average does it take for a rep to get fully up-to-speed? • How important is it for you to get under-performing sales resources corrected and on the right path toward meeting or exceeding their objectives? • How concerned are you about your current level of sales staff turnover? • How open are you to exploring new ways to boost sales performance for your sales resources? Target Prospect Introduction Elevator Pitch Qualifying Questions Common Pain Examples Brief Company and Product Info Close Disqualify Statement
  23. 23. Call Blueprint Share Some Common Problems Oh, OK. Well, as we talk with other Sales Managers, we have noticed that they often express challenges with (or concerns around): • It can be difficult to get the sales resources saying to right sales pitch and asking the right questions • It can take long time and be difficult getting new sales resources trained and ramped up • There is always a need to find ways to continue to improve sales performance • It can be difficult to get under-performing sales resources corrected and on the right path • It can be time consuming and a daunting task to get new and existing resources trained up and where they need to be • Sales staff turnover can be costly and it would be nice to find ways to decrease it Target Prospect Introduction Elevator Pitch Qualifying Questions Common Pain Examples Brief Company and Product Info Close Disqualify Statement
  24. 24. Call Blueprint Share Brief Company and Product (Pre- Close) Well, that is one of the reasons why I am reaching out as it sounds like we might have a productive conversation. • Product details • Benefits • ROI • Name drop • Differentiation • Picture of a future state • Threats of doing nothing Target Prospect Introduction Elevator Pitch Qualifying Questions Common Pain Examples Brief Company and Product Info Close Disqualify Statement
  25. 25. Call Blueprint Close But I have actually called you out of the blue so I do not want to take any more of your time right now. A great next step would be for us to schedule a/an brief 15 to 20 minute meeting where we can discuss your goals and challenges and share some examples of how we have helped organizations like yours. Is that something that you would like to put on the calendar? Target Prospect Introduction Elevator Pitch Qualifying Questions Common Pain Examples Brief Company and Product Info Close Disqualify Statement
  26. 26. SMART Sales System S M A R T ales essaging nd esponse actics SMART Sales System
  27. 27. SMART Sales System Sales Methodology Software Platform Professional Services
  28. 28. SMART Sales System Sales Methodology Software Platform Professional Services
  29. 29. SMART Sales System Sales Methodology Software Platform Professional Services Sales Training • Recorded Training Videos • Live Sales Training (virtual) • Live Sales Training (in-person) • Custom Sales Training
  30. 30. Sales Methodology Software Platform Professional Services • Will help you to build your pitch • Library of Scripts and Templates • Library of Scripts and Templates • CRM Functionality
  31. 31. Sales Methodology Software Platform Professional Services Sales Consulting • Sales Pitch Development • Sales Process Mapping • Script Assessment Sales Coaching • One-on-One Sales Coaching • Weekly coaching • Coaching Hour Blocks
  32. 32. Contact Us Michael Halper Founder and CEO SalesScripter mhalper@salesscripter.com @salesscripter

Editor's Notes

  • When a gatekeeper answers your call, he or she is instantly trying to screen you out and determine if you are a friend or a foe. A friend would be someone who is already connected with the company in someway like a current vendor or business partner and a foe would be someone who is an outsider trying to get in, like one of those cold callers that is calling to try to get in and sell something.

    What we want to do is try to get the gatekeeper to see us as a friend so they will less likely to screen us out and one very easy way to do that is to use a tactic of name dropping.

    For example, we can say something like, I spoke with Tom White in accounting and now I am trying to reach someone in HR. This presents the image that we are already engaged and not a complete outsider and this minor tweak can often be the difference in the gatekeeper letting you in.

    And if we have not met with Tom White in accounting, we could still name drop his name by saying something like, I am planning on meeting with Tom White in accounting and before I do that, I would like with someone in HR.” Nothing misleading there as we likely are planning on meeting with Tom at some point and by sharing his name and our plans, we give off the image as we are not a complete outsider.

    We can also name drop external clients that we work with to establish some level of credibility. That is not going to be as strong as sharing internal names and is probably only going to really help when talking with more senior gatekeepers like executive assistants.




  • When a gatekeeper answers your call, he or she is instantly trying to screen you out and determine if you are a friend or a foe. A friend would be someone who is already connected with the company in someway like a current vendor or business partner and a foe would be someone who is an outsider trying to get in, like one of those cold callers that is calling to try to get in and sell something.

    What we want to do is try to get the gatekeeper to see us as a friend so they will less likely to screen us out and one very easy way to do that is to use a tactic of name dropping.

    For example, we can say something like, I spoke with Tom White in accounting and now I am trying to reach someone in HR. This presents the image that we are already engaged and not a complete outsider and this minor tweak can often be the difference in the gatekeeper letting you in.

    And if we have not met with Tom White in accounting, we could still name drop his name by saying something like, I am planning on meeting with Tom White in accounting and before I do that, I would like with someone in HR.” Nothing misleading there as we likely are planning on meeting with Tom at some point and by sharing his name and our plans, we give off the image as we are not a complete outsider.

    We can also name drop external clients that we work with to establish some level of credibility. That is not going to be as strong as sharing internal names and is probably only going to really help when talking with more senior gatekeepers like executive assistants.




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