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Practical Networked Leadership Course: Module 1

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Practical Networked Leadership Course: Module 1

  1. Networked Leadership Skills: Building Thought Leadership on Social Media Module 1: Discovering Your Personal Brand Beth Kanter , Master Trainer, Blogger, and Author KDMC January 28, 2015
  2. Beth Kanter: Master Trainer, Author, and Blogger @kanter http://bethkanter.wikispaces.com/uc-berkeley
  3. Roll Call Tina Boyes Akron Community Foundation Tracy Burt Akron Community Foundation Molly Kunkel Centre County Community Foundation Carol Goglia Communities Foundation of Texas Claire Hodges Communities Foundation of Texas Cara Matteliano Community Foundation for Greater Buffalo Justine David Community Foundation for Greater Buffalo Kate French Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan Roberta King Grand Rapids Community Foundation Kelly Ryan Incourage Foundation Shannon K Semmerling Incourage Foundation Erica Fizer Legacy Foundation Joan Vallejo Oregon Community Foundation Sandi Vincent Oregon Community Foundation Kristin Dunstan The Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta, Inc. Erin Dreiling The Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta, Inc. Rebecca Arno The Denver Foundation Luann Lovlin The Winnipeg Foundation Noah Erenberg The Winnipeg Foundation Shelley Prichard Wichita Community Foundation
  4. Course Overview Learning Objectives: • Participants will create or refine a personal brand or leadership profile on Twitter that supports their professional development goals and/or organization’s communications objectives • Participants will learn the practical skills of writing great tweets, professional relationship building Twitter, and the art of content curation on Twitter. • Participants will share tips and insights with each other as they practice their skills with simple “homework” assignments. Audience • Community Foundations • Participant List: • http://networked-leadership-skills.wikispaces.com/Participants
  5. Course Overview Instructional Platforms The course will be delivered through the following: Course Meetings: The course content will be delivered through an interactive webinar where the main concepts, examples, and home work assignments will be shared and discussed. The course meetings will be 60-90 minutes Course Wiki: Resources, including slides, recording, and additional reading and resources, will be available at: http://networked-leadership-skills.wikispaces.com/ Twitter Hashtag: Participants will use Twitter hashtag #netlead for “practice”
  6. Schedule Date: Tuesday, January 27, 2015 - 1-2:30 PM PST Module 1 Discovering Your Personal Brand on Social Date: Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015 – 1:00-2:30 PM PST Module 2 Content Curation on Twitter: Deepening Expertise and Learning Date: Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015 1-2:30 PM PST Module 3 Professional Networking and Relationship Building on Social Channels Date: Tuesday, March 10, 2015 1-2 PM PST Module 4 Learning Culmination
  7. AGENDA OUTCOMES Interactive Peer Learning Reflective HASHTAG: #netlead FRAMING • Strategy Link • Articulate personal brand on Twitter • Practice Writing Great Tweets Today’s Class http://networked-leadership-skills.wikispaces.com/ • Why Build Your Personal Brand or Leadership Profile With Social • Personal brand in service of organizational strategy • Uncovering Your Authentic Personal Brand • Writing Your Twitter Elevator Pitch • Writing great social media Tweets and social media updates that get noticed
  8. Why Build Your Personal Brand/Leadership Profile on Social
  9. Why Build Leadership Profile On Social: Benefits • Reach: Ability to reach a different audience than the organization’s profile • Humanize: People trust individuals more than organizational brand • Flexibility: Less formal or structured than organizational channels • Less Risk: Staff are better champions for your organization than outsiders • Reinforces Expertise: Makes knowledge more visible • Amplify Existing Work: Social amplifies the work you are already doing in other ways
  10. Personal Professional Private Public Personal Professional Private Public Worlds Collide: Identity and Boundaries Before Social Media
  11. Turtle • Profile locked down • Share content with family and personal friends • Little benefit to your organization/professional Jelly Fish • Profile open to all • Share content & engage frequently with little censoring • Potential decrease in respect Chameleon • Profile open or curated connections • Content/Engagement Strategy: Purpose, Persona, Tone • Increased thought leadership for you and your organization Based on “When World’s Collide” Nancy Rothbard, Justin Berg, Arianne Ollier-Malaterre (2013) What Kind of Social Animal Are You?
  12. Reflection Questions • What is your biggest challenge navigating personal and professional boundaries on social media? What is most uncomfortable? • How can you be more comfortable being a “Chameleon”?
  13. Personal Brand In Service of Organizational Strategy
  14. Strategic Voice Audience Authentic Personal Brand How To Be A Chameleon on Social
  15. Personal Brand in Service of Organizational Strategy Audience: Socially engaged public Audience: Journalists, Diplomats, and Influencers GOAL Engagement Support
  16. Personal Brand in Service of Organizational Strategy
  17. Personal Brand in Service of Organizational Strategy
  18. The Goodman Theatre and Robert Falls Audience: Theatre Attenders Theatre Ticket Buyers Audience: Artists, Arts Critics, Arts Leaders GOAL Engagement Sell Tickets
  19. Organizational VS Leader Voice
  20. RWJF: Foundation Strategy “We believe that striving toward a culture of health will help us realize our mission to improve health and health care for all Americans. ” GOALS Inform Behavior Change Audience: Grantees, Policy Makers, Researchers, Practitioners
  21. Socially-Engaged Staff Support Strategy Audience: Specific content areas and communities
  22. Aligning Personal Brand with Organizational Strategy GOALS Awareness Engagement Fundraising Action Audience: Supporters, Donors, Advocates
  23. Audience: Influencers, Journalists, Policy Makers, World Leaders
  24. Reflection Questions • What are the key objectives of your foundation's communications strategy and organizational use of social media? • How can you leverage your personal brand or leadership profile in service of these objectives?
  25. Uncovering Your Authentic Personal Brand
  26. “Be yourself because everyone else is already taken.” - Oscar Wilde
  27. Think and Write: Uncovering Your Authentic Personal Brand • What’s your superpower? What do you do better than anyone else? • What do people frequently compliment you on or praise you for? • What is it that your manager, colleagues, and grantees come to you for? • What adjectives do people consistently use to describe you – perhaps when they’re introducing you to others? • How do you do what you do? What makes the way you achieve results interesting or unique? • What energizes or ignites you?
  28. Turn It Into Your Elevator Speech on Twitter! It’s accurate. One professional description. It’s exciting. One word that is not boring. It’s targeted. One niche descriptor. It’s flattering. One accomplishment. It’s humanizing. One hobby. It’s intriguing. One interesting fact or feature about yourself. It’s connected. Your organization, hashtag or another social profile.
  29. Twitter Elevator Speech: Profile Bio/Image
  30. Twitter Elevator Speech: Profile Bio/Image
  31. Twitter Elevator Speech: Profile Bio/Image
  32. Twitter Elevator Speech: Profile Bio/Image
  33. 34 Twitter Elevator Speech: Profile Bio/Image
  34. Twitter Elevator Speech: Profile Bio/Image
  35. Write Your Elevator Speech Answer these questions in 160 characters in your profile bio: • What is your expertise? • Why should someone follow you? • What hashtags or keywords do you want to be associated with? • Visual: What cover and profile image conveys your personal brand?
  36. Finding Your Voice on Twitter
  37. 5 Ways Authentic Ways To Build Thought Leadership on Twitter WRITER LISTENER SHARER LEADER ENGAGER
  38. Baby Shoes for Sale. Never Worn. Brevity: Write Tweets Like Hemingway Wrote Sentences
  39. 4 0 •Omit needless words •Describe •Simplify •Avoid giving it all away •One thought per tweet Style Matters
  40. •Be visual •Inspirational Quote •Observation or OH •Something Funny •RT with Added Value or Humor •Timely •Social Overcoming Twitter Writer’s Block
  41. Be Visual: Examples
  42. Quotes Humor Quotes and Humor: Examples
  43. RT w/Value: Examples
  44. Timely: Examples
  45. Be Social: Examples
  46. Homework • Update your Twitter Profile with an authentic elevator profile • Practice writing great tweets using the 7 ways to avoid Twitter Writer’s Block – one great tweet per day and use hashtag: #netlead
  47. Next Class Date: Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015 – 1:00-2:30 PM PST Module 2 Content Curation on Twitter: Deepening Expertise and Learning We will cover listening and sharing for learning on Twitter

Editor's Notes

  • Networked Leadership Skills: Building Thought Leadership on Social Media



  • 35 years, last 20 front row seat
    Passion for teaching and learning, not just a job, taken me all over the world working thousands of NGOs on becoming networked nonprofits and use social media effectively
    My greatest hope in writing a book about networks and measurement that nonprofits would improve their practice
    While Visiting scholar at the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, I didn’t just sit in the corner and write a book, I had the change to work closely with many of their grants to build capacity
    I had 60 grantees testing the frameworks – chased after them – were able to implement, how would you change – and they developed a lot of the case studies
    Honored that the book received the 2013 Terry McAdams award ..
    But I think I had a bigger achievement than that – when Conant O’Brien talked about my red hat on national TV
  • Learning Objectives:
     
    Participants will create or refine a personal brand or leadership profile on Twitter and LinkedIn that supports their professional development goals and organization’s communications objectives
    Participants will learn the practical skills of writing great tweets and LinkedIn updates, professional relationship building on LinkedIn and Twitter, and the art of content curation on Twitter.
    Participants will share tips and insights with each other as they practice their skills with simple “homework” assignments.
    Audience
     
    Community Foundations
     
     
    Instructional Platforms
     
    The course will be delivered through the following:
     
    Course Meetings: The course content will be delivered through an interactive webinar where the main concepts, examples, and home work assignments will be shared and discussed. The course meetings will be 60 or 90-minute sessions.
    Course Wiki: Resources, including slides and additional reading and resources, will be available at: http://networked-leadership-skills.wikispaces.com/
    Private Facebook Group: Participants will have access to a private Facebook group to ask questions and share insights in between class meetings.
    Twitter Hashtag: Participants will use Twitter hashtag #netlead for homework assignments
     
    Syllabus: Overview
     
    Date: Tuesday, January 27, 2015 - 1-2:30 PM PST
    Module 1
    Discovering Your Personal Brand on Social
     
    Date: Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015 – 1:00-2:30 PM PST
    Module 2
    Content Curation on Twitter: Deepening Expertise and Learning
     
    Date: Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015 1-2:30 PM PST
    Module 3
    Professional Networking and Relationship Building on Social Channels
     
     
    Date: Tuesday, March 10, 2015 1-2 PM PST
    Module 4
    Learning Culmination
     
  • Learning Objectives:
     
    Participants will create or refine a personal brand or leadership profile on Twitter and LinkedIn that supports their professional development goals and organization’s communications objectives
    Participants will learn the practical skills of writing great tweets and LinkedIn updates, professional relationship building on LinkedIn and Twitter, and the art of content curation on Twitter.
    Participants will share tips and insights with each other as they practice their skills with simple “homework” assignments.
    Audience
     
    Community Foundations
     
     
    Instructional Platforms
     
    The course will be delivered through the following:
     
    Course Meetings: The course content will be delivered through an interactive webinar where the main concepts, examples, and home work assignments will be shared and discussed. The course meetings will be 60 or 90-minute sessions.
    Course Wiki: Resources, including slides and additional reading and resources, will be available at: http://networked-leadership-skills.wikispaces.com/
    Private Facebook Group: Participants will have access to a private Facebook group to ask questions and share insights in between class meetings.
    Twitter Hashtag: Participants will use Twitter hashtag #netlead for homework assignments
     
    Syllabus: Overview
     
  • Building Your Leadership Profile With Social
  • Why build a thought leadership profile online:
     
    For your organization, a leadership profile online for your executive director can help your organization reach a different audience that may not already be following your brand. Your CEO (and all employees for that matter) will be tapping in their professional networks.
     
    Your logo alone is not enough to build trust for your organization’s brand, it requires a human face to humanize the brand, not a logo. CEOs are seen as experts on your brand and products, thus their opinions are extremely valuable and trusted by the people in their networks. Due to the more personal nature of professional networks, brand messages are shared more when they are shared by employees than when shared by the brand itself.
     
    Your organization’s branded social channels will most likely have a formal and structured editorial calendar linked to your policy agenda and other communications objectives. Having your CEO use social in a separate channel gives you more flexibility, esp. with breaking news.
     
    Your leader as a champion and personal brand for your organization is going to have less risk than external volunteers or champions. They understand the brand’s mission and value and they know your issues better than anyone else. Your CEO already understands your brand guidelines and will most likely operate within it.
     
    Using social media isn’t just a distraction, it amplifies and enhances the work your CEO is already doing. Most nonprofit leaders have to keep up with their sector, field, or issues anyway – and openly sharing what they are reading – useful content and news with some analysis helps contributes to thought leadership – especially on social channels like Twitter where many reporters use it to source leaders for stories or policy makers (and their staff) are monitoring. If other leaders in your field are using social channels, easily connect for leadership conversations.
    ---------



    If your nonprofit’s executive director or CEO a thought leader? Thought leaders drive conversations – online and off, influence others, and shape perceptions in their field. They are the respected voices who others turn to understand sector social change issues.
     
    It is no longer enough for your organization’s brand to lead through social media channels. Your organization’s CEO also needs to be connected on social to be effective as a thought leader. There are significant benefits to both the organization and the leaders themselves by building a leadership profile on social.

    For the organization …

    Reach different audience

    The CEO and all employees for that matter will likely be reaching a different audience through their social channels – tapping their professional networks.

    Humanize and build trust for organization brand

    In a recent Gartner study, only 15 percent of people said that trust posts by companies or brands on social networking sites – a startling statistic when compared to the fact that the same
    study found 70 percent trust brand or product recommendations from friends and family. Employees are seen as experts on your brand and products, thus their opinions are extremely valuable and trusted by the people in their networks. Due to the more personal nature of employee networks, brand messages are shared eight times more by employees are than when shared by the brand.


    Flexibility in communications style

    Your organization’s branded social channels will most likely have a formal and structured editorial calendar linked to your policy agenda and other communications objectives. Having your CEO use social in a separate channel gives you more flexibility, esp. with breaking news.

    Less Risk

    Your leader as a champion and personal brand for your organization is going to have less risk than external volunteers or champions. They understand the brand’s mission and value and they know your issues better than anyone else. Your CEO already understands your brand guidelines and will most likely operate within it.


    Learning: Make Expertise More Visible

    Most nonprofit leaders have to keep up with their sector, field, or issues anyway – and openly sharing what you’re reading – useful content and news with some analysis helps builds thought leadership – especially on social channels like Twitter where many reporters use it to source leaders for stories or policy makers (and their staff) are monitoring. If other leaders in your field are using social channels, easily connect for leadership conversations.


    Enhance work already doing

    Leaders are doing press conferences, keeping up with their field of practice, making public appearances and giving presentations, etc – social channels provide a way to amplify and enhance this work.


    Professional learning

    Using social channels to follow the news, especially when many news organizations have a “Twitter first” policy



  • But to reap the benefits, you have to understand how to navigate boundaries and your online reputation …

    Before social networks and the Internet, it was fairly easy to put clear boundaries between work and personal lives – it was pretty black and white Public/Private and Personal/Professional.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/stuart_spivack/29407740/sizes/o/
    But in today’s world, those boundaries are pretty blurred.

    As employees of nonprofits increasingly interact with their professional contacts in online social networks that favor individual participation, such as Facebook or Twitter, they are likely to
    experience a collision of their professional and personal identities. It’s one of the realities of living in a networked world – and as much as it makes feel uncomfortable – we have to accept it.

    However, it doesn’t mean it has to be all bad.

    Nonprofit CEOs (nd their employees) that develop expertise with boundary management and identity negotiation can experience many benefits but also challenges.
    On one hand, as an individual you can now reach many new audiences – but the problem is that you don’t get the same physical and social cues that have guided out human interaction for centuries. On social channels, people don’t have to interact with you to develop an opinion of you as a person based on reading your social stream.

    But, don’t let that scare you away, there are ways to manage it …



    -Social media policy in place that clearly spells out who “owns” the personal brand



  • There are basically three ways to react ..
    You can be a turtle …

    You can be a jelly fish

    Or a Chameleon

    If you truly want to establish an effective leadership profile online that supports your organization’s work, you need to be a chameleon.
    It takes more time, savvy, comfort – but you can start with small steps which I’ll take about in minute .. But first you need a strategy for your leadership profile that is complementary to your organization’s strategy .
  • Let’s look at how Chameleon’s manage their leader profiles on social ..

    First, they know the audience they want to reach on different channels and where it overlaps with their organizations.

    Maybe your organization wants to cultivate media and using Twitter might be a natural choice because so many reporters use it as a tool for research.
    Maybe it is the policy makers you want to reach and many use Twitter ..


    Next, what’s your purpose? How does social media enhance the work you are already doing?

    Engage with peers? Educate influencers? Amplify organization’s messaging?


    Persona – what is the image you want to convey?
    Professorial Inspiring Authoritative

    What tone is needed?
    Tone
    Humble Scientific Insider Serious
    How does this complement your organization’s social strategy?
  • https://twitter.com/kanter/status/555868668140089344
    http://www.cooperationinternationalegeneve.ch/twitter-and-unhcr


    We have our institutional handle - @refugees with 1.3 million followers. That is obviously an astounding number of people to direct access to. But in addition, we encourage our spokespeople and public information colleagues to tweet under their own handle and about the work they are doing. As UNHCR's Chief Spokesperson, I try to lead by example by actively tweeting on@melissarfleming.


    For our @refugees account, we aim to reach a broad spectrum of the socially engaged public, from "mommy bloggers' to political activists, to humanitarians to celebrities. I aim to reach journalists and diplomats and other influencers on my@melissarfleming feed.

  • Here’s an example from the Goodman Theatre - - they have an org profile on Twitter, but their artistic director does too

    Both support of the goals of engaging audiences and selling tickets …
  • They do this with different styles/tones of communication.
    Robert Falls is a conversationalist, talking about the art with a more informal tone.

    The brand is more formal and focused on the goal of promotion.
  • Questions to Ask When Uncovering Your Personal Brand
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/williamarruda/2013/11/12/7-questions-to-ask-when-uncovering-your-personal-brand/

    In the end, why are you here? Are you working to educate your audience, inspire action, or amplify messages? This should be identified in your social media support plan …. But you should own it. Make it your own.

    Your personal brand will topple if it sits on a foundation that’s not based in truth or perceived as genuine. And you’ll be worn out too. Anne Morrow Lindbergh once said “The most exhausting thing you can be is inauthentic.”  Being someone you’re not is hard work. It takes effort to play a role. Just ask the actors on Broadway who play their part 8 times a week.

    Because branding is based in authenticity, you need to understand who you are and what makes you compelling to your target audience – the people who are making decisions about you. As you think about what makes you YOU, ponder these questions:


    What’s your superpower? What do you do better than anyone else?
    What do people frequently compliment you on or praise you for?
    What is it that your manager, colleagues, and grantees come to you for?
    What adjectives do people consistently use to describe you – perhaps when they’re introducing you to others?
    How do you do what you do? What makes the way you achieve results interesting or unique?
    What energizes or ignites you?

    Think and Write: Take a few minutes to think about these questions and jot down some answers





  • Image Source:
    Creative Commons
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/foshydog/5019323386/



    What’s Twitter Elevator Speech,
    Your Twitter Elevator Speech
    http://www.bethkanter.org/1-step-01/
     
    An elevator speech is a short summary used to quickly and simply define a person, profession, product, service, organization or event and its value.
    The name "elevator pitch" reflects the idea that it should be possible to deliver the summary in the time span of an elevator ride, or approximately thirty seconds to two minutes and is widely credited the editors at Vanity Fair. The term itself comes from a scenario of an accidental meeting with someone important in the elevator. If the conversation inside the elevator in those few seconds is interesting and value adding, the conversation will continue after the elevator ride or end in exchange of business card or meeting.

    Some communications training has you commonly rehearse and use elevator pitches to get your point across quickly.

    Your profile on Twitter is your elevator speech.
  • Your Twitter elevator speech is what goes in your bio
    A strong bio can lead to more followers, and is an ideal way to introduce you to others. It helps others know what to expect if they follow you. You have 160 characters to present a concise summary about yourself that may include your title @foundation handle, and keywords if you have a crisp, compelling purpose around the content you share and your areas of interest.



  • Your Twitter elevator speech is what goes in your bio
    A strong bio can lead to more followers, and is an ideal way to introduce you to others. It helps others know what to expect if they follow you. You have 160 characters to present a concise summary about yourself that may include your title @foundation handle, and keywords if you have a crisp, compelling purpose around the content you share and your areas of interest.



  • How do they express their authenticity?
    What gets your attention?


  • Your Twitter elevator speech is what goes in your bio
    A strong bio can lead to more followers, and is an ideal way to introduce you to others. It helps others know what to expect if they follow you. You have 160 characters to present a concise summary about yourself that may include your title @foundation handle, and keywords if you have a crisp, compelling purpose around the content you share and your areas of interest.



  • How do they express their authenticity?
    What gets your attention?


  • https://twitter.com/philkil
  • Image Source:
    Creative Commons
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/foshydog/5019323386/



    What’s Twitter Elevator Speech,
    Your Twitter Elevator Speech
    http://www.bethkanter.org/1-step-01/
     
    An elevator speech is a short summary used to quickly and simply define a person, profession, product, service, organization or event and its value.
    The name "elevator pitch" reflects the idea that it should be possible to deliver the summary in the time span of an elevator ride, or approximately thirty seconds to two minutes and is widely credited the editors at Vanity Fair. The term itself comes from a scenario of an accidental meeting with someone important in the elevator. If the conversation inside the elevator in those few seconds is interesting and value adding, the conversation will continue after the elevator ride or end in exchange of business card or meeting.

    Some communications training has you commonly rehearse and use elevator pitches to get your point across quickly.

    Your profile on Twitter is your elevator speech.
  • Jeremey Caplan, who is the director of education Tow-Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism …

    Writer: Write concise Tweets Listener: Find, listen, and learn from relevant sources Sharer: Share links and resources that are relevant, your expertise, or link to your authentic personal brand Leader: Lead and participate in Twitter discussions Engager: Retweet, ask questions, say thank you, build relationships with your network
  • Inspirational Quote
    Something Funny
    Two words
    RT with Added Value or Humor


  • Two Words
    https://twitter.com/paulocoelho/statuses/468055687936102400



    https://twitter.com/iTweetFacts/status/400264657107451905
  • Inspiration Quote
    https://twitter.com/alaindebotton/statuses/460087635353296897

    Tips for Using Quotes (Including finding sources of quotes)
    http://www.bethkanter.org/quote/


    Something Funny
    https://twitter.com/CIA/statuses/486254611250937857

    How to be hilarious on Twitter
    http://www.fastcocreate.com/1682943/how-to-be-hilarious-on-twitter-from-a-writer-who-tweeted-her-way-to-tv

  • RT w/ Value or Humor
    https://twitter.com/Nedra/status/16900299419
  • https://twitter.com/avinash/status/1270289378

    Overheard …

    https://twitter.com/GSElevator/status/483393723032555521
  • http://www.jeffbullas.com/2015/01/24/8-compelling-ways-to-tell-140-character-stories-on-twitter/#SkgMp07159vpBFQ0.99
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