Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Upcoming SlideShare
Diapositivas
Diapositivas
Loading in …3
×
1 of 5

Customer Service Workshops

1

Share

Download to read offline

Delivered by Ash Charlton at ARLG Conference 2016

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Customer Service Workshops

  1. 1. 11:10am to 11:55am Withthe changes in funding, students increasinglysee themselves as customers buying a service from the university, and this sense of empowerment has ledto an increase inchallenging behaviour. In this sessionwe’ll be looking at the causes of this behaviour inorder toget the right approach for minimising conflict, anddefusing it when it arises. We will be discuss ing useful techniques to make your encounters as positive as possible for you and your customers. ♦ Brainstorm: hatred ♦ Discussion: why are they like that? ♦ Summaryof advocacy ♦ Discussion: best approach ♦ Summary: 4 ‘e’s 12:00pm to 12:45pm (GMT) Everyone working for anacademic institutionnow has a more difficult jobthan they had five years ago, soit seems only fair they should be giventechniques for coping with stress. Inthis sessionwe’ll be looking at the different types of stress, wi th useful tools to minimise the impact of each of them. It isn’t always possible to stop or avoid difficult situations, but we have some influence on how they affect us, and that is the focus of this workshop. ♦ Pair work: stressful situation ♦ Stress types: diagnosis ♦ Ruth anecdote: power of cognitive restructuring ♦ Presentation: 3 types, subcategories ♦ Pair work: application ♦ Discussionand examples
  2. 2. 1. GENERAL APPROACH: As statedearlier,the factthatbehaviourisunderstandable doesnotmake itacceptable oreven forgiveable. Itdoes,however,giveussome cluesasto how bestto deal withit,whichI have categorizedintothe ‘4E’s’ of dealingwithempoweredclientgroups: Empathy: Sympathetic Approach: Beingaware that customershave emotions,andsympathisingwith and responding to these: keeping the encounter human. This may include reassurance for people whoare panickyand distressed,andbeingsensitive towhatmood the customeris in and adjusting your manner accordingly. Thanking Them: Thanks cost nothing, and add to goodwill, so always thank people where appropriate: for bringing something to your attention or letting you sort it out. Active Listening: See more details on this later! Patience: Language studentsneedlotsof patience:they’re undera lotof pressure,and it is very stressful to always be communicating in a language which you’re only just learning. Equality: Careful ofdignity: Itisveryeasyforstudentstofeelbelittledorinfantalised. Inyourlanguage and tone, be aware of where you might be in danger of doing this. BeingPositive: Alwaystryto give informationinthe positive:what can be done before what can’t. Safety: Making sure the client feels as happy and relaxed as possible talking to you. Ready to Apologise: Like thanks,apologiescostnothingandbuyyougoodwill,sobe readyto apologise forbeingunclear(eventhoughyouknow it’sthe client’sfault!) orthat the system cannot deliver the results they would prefer. Taking Them Seriously: Even thoughsome of your customer’sconcerns may seemtrivial or even ridiculous, they are important for the person who has them, and you should always respect this. ExplainingConstraints and GivingReasons: ‘It’spolicy’isn’ta reason:there is a reasonwhy thatpolicywasagreed. Alwayskeepcustomersintheknow aboutwhatthe rulesare andwhy they are so. Efficiency: Follow-up: Checkingyou’ve done whatyou’ve promised,orthat the customerhas delivered ontheirside of things. Givethemachance tomake goodif they’vefailed:don’tjustwaituntil a deadline has passed!
  3. 3. Prioritising: Customersare oftenflustered,andnotgoodat realisingwhatneedstobe done first. You can help with this, taking charge of the encounter and prioritising. Having Template Emails etc. ready: Not those dreadful ‘out of office’ things, but standard friendly emails that let people know if there will be a delay. Not Taking it Personally: Unless you’re getting far more difficult customers than your colleagues, remember that it’s the situation the customer is upset with, not you! FindingBestSolutionto Problem: Take time tofindthatyou’ve gotthe verybestsolutionfor the customer: it gives you a clear conscience and saves time later. Selling Referrals: If you have to send someone somewhere else, let them know why and explainwhy it is in their interest. If possible, give a recommendation, or a contact person. Empowerment: Setting RealisticExpectations: Making sure,in the nicestpossible way,thatthe clienthas a clear idea of what is possible or likely. Building Personal Relationship: Especially withagents, but it works well with students too. Learn names, learn something about them: it helps greatly when there is a conflict, and generally increases goodwill. WillingtoNegotiate Where Possible: Customersshouldfeelyourorganisationisreasonable: make sure theyknowwhere anegotiationispossible,andwhatthe constraintsuponthisare. Informof Choices: All advice shouldbe giveninthe formof achoice:customersshouldnever be treatedaschildrenandjust‘told’whatto do. Evenif it’sinthe form‘If youwant x youwill have to do y’, it’s still a choice.
  4. 4. Cognitive Restructuring - Guide to Techniques: There are of course a huge range of cognitive restructuringtechniques,toomanytoinclude here, but theyfall intothree maincategories: Different Perspective: Sometimesitcanhelptoshiftyourperspective,andchange the viewpointfromwhichyou’re seeing somethingwhichstressesorpainsyou. Examplesinclude: - Seeingitfrom another’s point ofview: e.g.otherroad usersare notusuallyoutto get youor make yourlife difficult:they’re justnotbeingasconsiderateastheycouldbe,or doingtheirbest. Dad on road - Not seeingyourselfasa victim: It’spossible tomake yourself unhappybycasting yourself asthe victiminthe middle of yourownprivate drama:‘They’ve all letme down rather than‘No-one’savailable’. Douglasrows - Focus on a positive aspect: If a group of people are argumentativeandvocal,well,at leastthey’re engagedwiththe topicandnotindifferenttoit. DaveBarry - Time Perspective: Thisisthe ‘we’ll all laughaboutitlater’perspective. Xmas - Rename it: ‘Challenging’customersare oftenjustassertive ones, ‘difficult’staff are oftenstaff whohave a lotof ownershipof whatthey’re doing. Mucheasiertothink aboutthemthisway! Empowered client group All of these involvemovingyourmental ‘viewpoint’,usuallyawayfromyourself. Openness: These techniquesare goodfordealingwiththe unexpected,orwithchangesinplans. Oftentheir can be unexpectedbenefitstosuchchangesprovidedwe’rereadytoacceptthem, usingtechniques like: - ReleasingExpectations: justbecause itisn’twhatyou plannedorexpected,doesn’t meanit’sa bad thing,butit’seasyto feel like that. The fact yourfrienddidn’tgetyou wantedforXmas doesn’tmeanwhatshe gotyou wasno good,or wasn’tthoughtful. In fact it maybe more thoughtful thanthe usual tie she getsyou! Rita Rudner - ReleasingControl: If youwere expectingtobe incontrol of a situationanditturnsout that you’re not(forexample,stayingwithfriendsitturnsoutthey’ve organisedtripsfor youwhichyou hadn’texpected),it’seasytofeel scaredorhelpless,justbecause you’re not the one incontrol. Onthe other hand,youcouldaccept that otherpeople beingin control mightdo justas gooda jobas you,if not betterforthisparticularthing:afterall, theyknowthe area better,know what’sgoodtosee and soon. Recap Cultawa course
  5. 5. - Opento Opportunities: A change in planswill bringnew opportunities. Youmay have preferredthe oldopportunities,andthe new onesmightnotbe as good,butyou mayas well make the mostof the new possibilitiesthatthe change brings. Lesswork:plug book! All of these involvelettinggoof something(expectations,control)andacceptingthe situationfor whatit is,not forwhat youwouldhave itbe. Comparison: You can make yourself unhappybycomparingasituationwithsome (frequentlyunattainable) idea, and moaningabouthowit doesn’tcome upto scratch, like complainingaboutbadweather. Oryou coulduse comparisonina differentway. - CountingBlessings: a bit of an old chestnutthis,butitoftenworks:how badlyoff are you,really? Doyou still have yourhealth,friends,lovedones,aroof overyour head, and can youallowyourself tofeel happyaboutthat? Or are you goingto be miserable eventhoughyouhave all these things,because youdidn’twinthe lottery? - At least it’snot worse: Or youcouldcompare downwardsinsteadof upwards. If you’re havinga busyday,at leastit’snotone of those seeminglyendlessoneswhere youdo nothingandfeel knackeredatthe endof it. Spencer:first world problems. - Comparing WithOthers: But choose yourotherswithcare! Someone once said,‘Never readybeautymagazines:theywillonlymake youfeelugly’,somake sure youmake a faircomparisonwithhowthe majorityof people are managing. German - Comparing Earlier: I wishIwas the weightwhenIfirststartedsaying‘youknow,Ireally needtolose weight’! Oftenitcanhelptocompare you currentsituationwithearlier ones,where youmayhave longedtobe in the situationyouare now in. Agent

×