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Responsible Metrics

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Responsible Metrics

  1. 1. What are ‘Responsible Metrics’? Senior Manager: (Library) Research Services https://tinyurl.com/DULC-Research
  2. 2. What do we mean by metrics? When we talk about ‘metrics’ in this context, we are usually referring to quantitative measure of research ‘impact’.
  3. 3. They might be used to measure…
  4. 4. They might be used to measure… A research output (article, book etc.)
  5. 5. They might be used to measure… An individual researcher’s output
  6. 6. They might be used to measure… An organisational units research output (e.g. all publications from a Research Group, Department, Institute or the whole University.
  7. 7. Percentile Benchmark Usually based on citation or publication counts…
  8. 8. Percentile Benchmark Usually based on citation or publication counts… A researcher may use them to help make important decisions… such as where to publish their work, or who to hire or collaborate with.
  9. 9. Percentile Benchmark Usually based on citation or publication counts… Or a publisher, funder or institution may use them to assess their research output… A researcher may use them to help make important decisions… such as where to publish their work, or who to hire or collaborate with.
  10. 10. Several University Rankings also include citation and publication metrics as part of their methodology.
  11. 11. What is the move to ‘responsible metrics’ about? ‘Responsible Metrics’ recognises that a quantitative metric - a number - only reveal part of a wider story of the impact research has made.
  12. 12. Many research metrics are not consistent and should not be used to compare two articles, researchers or institutions… … but they often are.
  13. 13. Some research metrics are susceptible to being manipulated (e.g. through self-citation)… … and sometimes are.
  14. 14. Many metrics fail to account for, or obscure, inherent bias in the system.
  15. 15. Some metrics can be misinterpreted, can produce different results, and may be unstable or inconsistent… ... but how they are used does not always take this into account.
  16. 16. A ‘Responsible Metrics’ approach recognises that metrics are often used inform important decisions… … recognises the full picture may not always be clear... … and seeks to use the appropriate metrics alongside other measures.
  17. 17. To provide a more complete view of the research impact.
  18. 18. What are a few quick tips to know? There is lots of information out there, but there are three key documents to be aware of…
  19. 19. The San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (2012) The Leiden Manifesto for research metrics (2015) The Metric Tide: Report of the Independent Review of the Role of Metrics in Research Assessment and Management (2015)
  20. 20. Whilst stated principles vary, common themes are shared:
  21. 21. Whilst stated principles vary, common themes are shared: Recognise the value of both qualitative and quantitative measures for research assessment.
  22. 22. Whilst stated principles vary, common themes are shared: Recognise the value of both qualitative and quantitative measures for research assessment. Ensure the accuracy and appropriateness of data used to calculate any metric.
  23. 23. Whilst stated principles vary, common themes are shared: Recognise the value of both qualitative and quantitative measures for research assessment. Ensure the accuracy and appropriateness of data used to calculate any metric. Build in openness and transparency of the metrics used, so that they can be checked and verified.
  24. 24. Whilst stated principles vary, common themes are shared: Recognise the value of both qualitative and quantitative measures for research assessment. Ensure the accuracy and appropriateness of data used to calculate any metric. Build in openness and transparency of the metrics used, so that they can be checked and verified. Account for variation including, but not limited to, disciplinary field, career stage and publication type.
  25. 25. Whilst stated principles vary, common themes are shared: Recognise the value of both qualitative and quantitative measures for research assessment. Ensure the accuracy and appropriateness of data used to calculate any metric. Build in openness and transparency of the metrics used, so that they can be checked and verified. Account for variation including, but not limited to, disciplinary field, career stage and publication type. Respond to changes in circumstance and purpose and review and update use over time.
  26. 26. What are ‘Responsible Metrics’? Senior Manager: (Library) Research Services https://tinyurl.com/DULC-Research

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