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Employee training

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Employee training

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Employee training

  1. 1. • According to , • According to , • According to ,
  2. 2.  Training is a follow-up of selection procedure.  Training brings about an improvement of the quality and quantity of output by increasing the skill of the employees.  Trained personnel will be able to make much better and more economical use of materials and equipment than untrained employees, thus reducing the cost of production.  Since trained personnel commit few mistakes, they will require less supervision.  Training can help reduce turnover, absenteeism, accidents, grievances rates.  The training will create a feeling among the workers that they are being properly cared for, and that the employer is sincere to them.
  3. 3. As employees acquire new knowledge and job skills, they increase their market value and wage-earning power. This increases their pay and status. The possession of useful skill enhances their value to their employer and thereby increases their job security. Training also qualify them for promotion to more responsible jobs.
  4. 4. Training is a costly and expensive process. Training may result in dislocation of work and loss of output because regular office work is likely to be interrupted or delayed because of the time spent in training. It is difficult to obtain good training instructors and leaders. Self-reliance and capacity for new ideas might be stifled.
  5. 5. 1. Training must conform to the individual intelligence and efficiency of the trainees. 2. Training must be supported by motivation. Motivation enables the trainees to learn quickly. 3. Training must be imparted by qualified and well-trained trainers and instructors. 4. Every trainee must be provided with course of progress reports. This enables the trainees to improve and rectify themselves. 5. The training of a complex and complicated jobs should be provided in parts. 6. Trainees must be encouraged to have sufficient practice. 7. Rewards and punishments must follow the process of training. 8. The approach of training should be systematic and authentic.
  6. 6. : Training increases the knowledge and skills of employees. Therefore, well-trained employees give better performance on the Job. Training results in higher quantity and quality of output. : Training builds self-confidence in the employees and enables them to achieve the required level of performance. Their enthusiasm pride and interest in the job and their morale goes up. Their attitude becomes more positive and co-operative. Turnover and absenteeism are reduced. : Generally, trained employees are less accident-prone than the untrained ones. Proper training develops safety attitudes and helps to reduce the accident rate. :Well-trained employees make better use of machines and materials. As a result the rate of spoilage or wastage of materials is reduced. There is less breakage of machinery and tools. The maintenance cost is reduced and life of machines is increased. Cost of production per unit is reduced.
  7. 7. : Trained employees need less guidance. Therefore, need for supervision is reduced. The span of supervision can be increased and the costs of supervision reduced. : An organisation with trained personnel can introduce latest technology to reduce costs of production. Trained employees show less resistance to change. The enterprise can easily adjust to short-term variations in the volume of work. : Trained employees are self-dependent and can perform routine work independently. Therefore, superiors can easily delegate authority and reduce their workload. They can practise management by exception and devote their time and energy to more important policy matters. : An enterprise having a pool of trained personnel can maintain its effectiveness despite the loss of key personnel. It can more easily replace executives. It can also meet the personnel needs for growth and expansion. Training provides a second line of personnel which helps to ensure long-term stability and growth of the organisation.
  8. 8. On-the-Job Training (OJT) Vestibule training Apprenticeship training Classroom training Internship training Induction Or Orientation Training
  9. 9.  In this method the trainee is placed on a regular job and taught the skills necessary to perform it. The trainee learns under the guidance and supervision of the superior or an instructor. The trainee learns by observing and handling the job. Therefore, it is called .  Several methods are used to provide on-the-job training, e.g  A popular form of on-the-job training is Job Instruction Training (JIT) or step by step learning.  OJT method provides immediate feedback, permits quick correction of errors and provides extra practice when required. But it needs skilled trainers and preparation in advance.  In order to make on-the-job training successful, some conditions must be satisfied: (a) what and how to teach should be carefully, decided, (b) the instructor should be carefully selected and trained, and (c) a definite follow-up schedule should be used to judge the results of training.
  10. 10. ON THE JOB TRAINING
  11. 11.  The main advantages of OJT is that the . He gets a feel of the actual job. Therefore, he is better motivated to learn and there is no problem of transfer of training skills to the job.  Secondly, this because no additional space, equipment, personnel or other facilities are requird for training. The trainee produces while he learns.  Thirdly,  Fourthly, this is which can be acquired through personal observation in a relatively short time period. It is widely used for unskilled and semiskilled jobs,  Fifthly their subordinates.
  12. 12. • In on-the-job training, the learner finds it due to noise of the actual work-place. • Secondly, this method is . The superior or experienced employee may not be a good trainer. • Thirdly, in this method .
  13. 13. • In this method a . • Expert trainers are employed to provide training with the help of equipment and machines which are identical with those used at the workplace.
  14. 14. • The main advantage of vestibule training is that the trainee can without disturbance of the workplace noise. • Secondly, as the real job conditions are duplicated. • Thirdly, this method is essential in cases where on-the-job training might result in a serious injury, a costly accident, or the destruction of valuable equipment and material, e.g., aeronautical industry. • Fourthly, by the trained instructor who knows how to teach. • Fifthly, and ridiculed by the superior/co-worker. • Lastly, . This method is also useful when it is not advisable to put the burden of training on line supervisors and when special coaching is needed. It is often used to train clerks, bank tellers, inspectors, inactive operators, testers, typists, etc
  15. 15. • Vestibule training is the because of additional investment in classroom, equipment and expert trainers. • Secondly, the is somewhat and the trainee does not get a feel of the real job. • Thirdly, may lead to problems in the organisation.
  16. 16. • In this method, . In India the Government has established Industrial Training Institutes (ITIs) for this purpose. Under the Apprenticeship Act, 1962 employers in specified industries are required to train the prescribed number of persons in ‘designated trades’. • The aim is to develop all-round craftsmen. Generally a stipend is paid during the training period. Thus, it is an scheme.
  17. 17. • Merits.  The main advantage of this method is that .  Secondly, the which are valuable in the job market.  Thirdly, apprenticeship programmes provide . • Demerits.  Apprenticeship training . Many persons leave the training programme midway as the training period ranges from one year to five years.  Apprenticeship training is the oldest method of training. It is particularly suitable for learning crafts and technical trades wherever job proficiency is the result of a relatively long training period. Draughtsman, machinist, printer, tool maker, pattern designer, mechanic, carpenter, weaver, fitter, jeweller, engraver, electrician, etc. are examples of such areas.
  18. 18.  Under this method, training is provided in company . are used to explain knowledge and skills to the trainees.  Classroom training is suitable for  It is also useful for  Some companies maintain their own training institutes or schools. Special training courses are designed,  Courses in retraining and upgrading may also be conducted.  Small firms depend on outside schools and courses.
  19. 19.  It is a of training in which educational institutions and business firms cooperate. carry on regular studies for the prescribed period.  They also work in some factory or office to acquire practical knowledge and skills.  This method helps to provide . But it involves a long time period due to slow process.  This method of training , etc.
  20. 20.  Induction or orientation refers to the activities involved in to the organisation and its policies, procedures, rules and regulations.  The main are as follows:  Clarifying the job,  Developing realistic expectations about the organisation,  Reducing the amount of stress and anxiety of the new employee,  Reducing start up costs, and  Strengthening the relationships between new employee, his superior and peers.
  21. 21. • In small firms the orientation is generally informal. • But in big organizations it may be a formal programme of two to four weeks. When a formal orientation course is to be conducted several days after the new employee joins duty, initial introduction should be given by the supervisor of the new employee. He should be given a friendly welcome and introduced to the other employees. He should be given a general idea about the rules, regulations, working conditions, etc. • A formal orientation programme is necessary because the early job experiences have significant impact on the long-term career commitment of the individual. In the absence of a formal programme, the new employee may form wrong impressions and he may take a lot of time in adjusting himself in new surroundings.
  22. 22. : 1. The history of the organisation, 2. Products and services of the company, 3. Organisation structure of the enterprise, -” 4. Location of departments and units, 5. Personnel policies and practices, 6. Employee’s facilities and services, 7. Rules and regulations, 8. Grievance procedure, 9. Safety measures, and 10. Standing orders.
  23. 23. : Training is a process of increasing knowledge, skills and attitude of an employee to do a particular job. : Main aim of training is to increase the knowledge of a person to do a particular job. : Training is obtained in a institute or at a training centre. : Training is, a liability of the employer itself.
  24. 24. : Expenses of training are generally borne by enterprises. : Training increases ability and skill. : Training is a narrow term and is limited to a particular aspect. : Training is of practical nature.
  25. 25. THANK YOU

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