Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

More Related Content

You Might Also Like

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Ethics and professionalism

  1. 1. Ethics and Professionalism
  2. 2. Ethics Defined: “Ethics is concerned with how we should live our lives. It focuses on questions about what is right or wrong, fair or unfair, caring or uncaring, good or bad, responsible or irresponsible, and the like.” (Jaksa and Pritchard, “Methods of Analysis”)
  3. 3. “Four-Way Test” for Ethical Decision Making (from Rotary International)  Is it the truth?  Is it fair to all concerned?  Will it build goodwill and better friendships?  Will it be beneficial to all concerned?
  4. 4. Professionals have the burden of making ethical decisions that satisfy:  The public interest  Their employer’s (or client’s) self interest  The standards of the profession  Their personal values In an ideal world, these four areas would not conflict but in reality they often do. “How many PR people have been asked to over-represent a product? How many agencies have been asked to take sides on issues that conflict with a healthy environment? The answer is that many of us participate in areas where ethical standards are vague at best.” (comments from a senior PR executive in PRSA’s The Strategist)
  5. 5. Public Expectations of PR?  Society, in general, expects public relations people to be advocates, just as they expect advertising copywriters to make a product sound attractive, journalists to be objective, and attorneys to defend someone in court  But communication efforts will not attempt, for example to present false/deceptive/misleading information under the guise of literal truth no matter how strongly the practitioners want to convince others of the merits of a particular clients/organization’s position/cause…(from Martinson, Florida International University)
  6. 6. Professional Codes of Ethics in PR  The Public Relations Society of America (PRSSA) Code of Ethics  PRSA Code (more detailed) online at: http://www.prssa.org/downloads/codeofethics.pdf  The Code’s core values: Advocacy Independence Honesty Loyalty Expertise Fairness  PRSA, with 22,000 members in 110 U.S chapters, is the world’s largest national PR organization  South Carolina PRSA Chapter: http://www.scprsa.org/  In second and third place (size-wise) are the International Association of Business Communicators (IABC) and the International Public Relations Association (IPRA)
  7. 7. Professionalism, Licensing and Accreditation  Professionalism—In PR there are differences of opinion about whether PR is a craft, skill, or a developing profession  Licensing—the debate continues over whether public relations should require professional licensing (such as the medical, legal and real estate fields have). There are strong pros and cons on each side  Accreditation—professional development certification programs help improve standards and professionalism in the field
  8. 8. Personal Ethics  Be honest at all times  Convey a sense of business ethics based on your own standards and those of society  Respect the integrity and position of your opponents and audiences  Develop trust by emphasizing substance over triviality  Present all sides of an issue  Strive for a balance between loyalty to the organization and duty to the public  Don’t sacrifice long-term objectives for short-term gains

×