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Aggression is the forceful reaction of a dog #dog #dogs or #cat

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AGGRESSION Aggression is the forceful reaction of a dog that feels threatened. Aggression can be normal behavior under certain circumstances. Dogs are naturally protective, and will often defend their territory (including owners) from any perceived threat. But when aggression becomes unreasonable or uncontrollable, the aggressive dog is a danger to everyone, including himself.

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Aggression is the forceful reaction of a dog #dog #dogs or #cat

  1. 1. Contrary to popular belief, dog aggression is not the same as viciousness. By definition, viciousness results from a desire to inflict pain on another, and that’s a human trait pets don’t have. Aggression is simply a component of dog behavior, and is normal within the appropriate context. Aggression is resolved once the animal (1) launches an attack, (2) turns tail and runs, or (3) displays a subordinate position—cries “uncle.” Dogs that are in pain or ill often become short-tempered and exhibit aggressive behavior when the owner unknowingly touches a sore place. If your usually easy-going dog suddenly growls, snaps or bites for no apparent reason, have him examined by a veterinarian. It doesn't matter if your dog is the retiring, shy type, or a confident macho canine, any dog may become aggressive given the right circumstances. Growls, snarls, barks, and bites are your dog's way to control the situation. AGGRESSION Aggression is the forceful reaction of a dog that feels threatened. Aggression can be normal behavior under certain circumstances. Dogs are naturally protective, and will often defend their territory (including owners) from any perceived threat. But when aggression becomes unreasonable or uncontrollable, the aggressive dog is a danger to everyone, including himself. AGGRESSION
  2. 2. Heredity plays a large role in how aggressive your dog may be. Certain breeds tolerate close contact with other dogs or strange people better than others. Much of this inbred aggression is our own fault, since for hundreds of years individual breeds have been developed to promote these traits. Also, owners may consciously—or unconsciously—encourage aggressive behavior during puppyhood because they want a "guard dog." But what may be cute and manageable in a ten pound puppy becomes dangerous when the adult weighs 60 pounds or more. Aggression can be categorized by the cause, or trigger, that prompts the behavior. Poor behavior can result from fear or anxiety, overly-enthusiastic play, misplaced predatory behavior, excessive dominance, or a combination of these or others. Physical punishment won't work, and will likely make the aggressive behavior even worse. Once aggression is a problem, the trigger must be identified so that a treatment specific to that cause can be initiated. The first step in categorizing aggression is to examine the context and body language involved. Once the type of aggression has been classified, a treatment program can be designed for the individual animal. Dominance Aggression Ninety percent of these pets are male dogs that develop the behavior by age 18 to 36 months, which corresponds with canine social maturity. Testosterone makes dogs react more intensely, and more quickly, for a longer period of time. When the dominant aggressive dog is female, the behavior tends to develop during puppyhood. The hallmark of dominance aggression is that it gets worse with punishment. It may be hereditary. Dominance aggressive behavior includes guarding food and possessions (toys or other objects), and redirected aggression. Redirected Aggression This behavior happens in response to a verbal or physical correction or thwarting of a desire, where the victim was not part of the trigger. For instance, the dog can’t reach to bite the mailman, so he bites the owner instead. Fear Aggression Dogs tends to bark, growl or snarl while backing up, shake or tremble during or after the display, bite from behind and then run, or cower and look for escape. Heredity plays a large role in shyness and aggression, particularly in certain breeds of dogs. Shyness is an important component of aggression because many animals bite out of fear. Using commercial products that mimic the “no-fear” pheromones that mother dogs produce during nursing may be of help. Many cases of canine aggression are neurochemically related to anxiety, and may benefit from antianxiety drugs.
  3. 3. Generally, these drugs are used for only a short time, along with behavior modification techniques, and are not intended for indefinite use. Interdog Aggression This is related to social standing and usually affects male-male or female-female interactions. Dogs challenge each other with stares, shoulder or hip bumps and shoves, mounting behavior, or blocking access to food, play, or attention. Older or weaker pets often are victimized. Neutering decreases interdog aggression in about two-thirds of the cases. Territorial Aggression Dogs protect property (house, car) by barking, growling, snarling, and biting no matter who is present. Aggression is made worse by boundary confinement (fence, chain, etc.). The aggression goes away when there’s no territory to defend, but these dogs typically identify new territory quickly. Treatment includes modifying the environment, behavior modification, and sometimes drugs.
  4. 4. Predatory Aggression in dogs is extremely dangerous. These dogs silently stalk smaller animals or infants and/or stare at them silently and drool. They may track and stalk bicyclists or skateboarders. High-pitched sounds, uncoordinated movements as an infant might make, or sudden silences (as happens with prey animals) may provoke an attack. Many of the terrier breeds have a highly developed predatory instinct similar to cats. They enjoy games of chase and pounce, and this can be dangerous for smaller pets in the household. Households with terriers should avoid keeping other pets like rabbits, ferrets, smaller cats or dogs that tend to be prime targets for such breeds.
  5. 5. Play Aggression looks similar to predatory aggression but begins as a game. This is more typical of youngsters who have not yet learned to inhibit their bite and may attack your ankles as you walk by. Remember, it may be endearing when your dog is a five-pound puppy, but grappling your hands and feet is painful when the dog reaches adulthood. Don't allow your hands or feet to be targets--ever. Playing rough games of wrestling with your puppy encourages him to be aggressive as an adult. Protective Aggression is unique to dogs. These animals protect owners from other people or dogs. Quick moves or embraces may stimulate the aggression. Protective aggressive dogs are not aggressive in the absence of their owners.
  6. 6. Idiopathic Aggression is also exclusive to dogs. This is an atypical, toggle- switch aggression with no known trigger. Most affected dogs are one to three years old, and the behavior often is misdiagnosed as dominant aggression. In many cases, aggression can be greatly reduced by neutering be-fore the dog reaches sexual maturity. In addition, proper socialization during puppyhood prepares your pet for dealing with life without resorting to aggression (see PUPPY/SOCIALIZATION). Holistic veterinarians may recommend specialized massage techniques such as TTouch to help counter some types of aggression. Aromatherapy, using bergamot essential oil, is said to help very wild or fractious pets. You can try placing a couple of drops of the oil on a bandana for the dog to wear around his neck. Another type of aggression, commonly referred to as "rage syndrome," is a rare pathological disorder. An abnormality of the brain causes seizure-like episodes of inexplicable rage in which the dog may attack anything--living or not--within sight with little or no provocation. The rage disappears as suddenly as it appears. Certain breeds are associated with this condition, in particular Springer Spaniels. Bull Terriers and Cocker Spaniels also are implicated. The dog's history along with a neurological examination is required to diagnose the problem. Behavior modification techniques that work with other aggression problems are ineffective in rage syndrome, but some types of seizure medications like Phenobarbital help some dogs. Cures are impossible, and sadly, in cases where the dog presents a danger, euthanasia is the only option. For your safety and that of others, familiarize yourself to the signs of aggression (see COMMUNICATION) so that you can avoid provoking an aggressive dog to attack. Above all, do not hesitate to seek professional help. In many cases, an aggressive dog is an accident waiting to happen; if your dog's actions makes you fear for your own safety or others, his aggression is best diagnosed and treated by a professional animal behaviorist or therapist. Some dogs benefit from psychoactive drug therapy (see APPENDIX B, VETERINARY RESOURCES). ALLERGY Allergy is an over-reaction of the dog’s immune system. Antibodies are specialized cells of the immune system that protect the body from foreign invaders, such as viruses and bacteria. Specific white blood
  7. 7. cells such as eosinophils also play a role in the development of allergies. But sometimes these protective cells mis-recognize harmless substances like dust, mold or pollen as dangerous, and attack. The heightened response to these substances, called allergens, results in the allergy symptoms your dog suffers. Dogs theoretically can develop allergies to anything, just like their human owners. To develop an allergy, the dog must have been exposed to it in the past; this primes, or sensitizes, the body’s immune system to overreact. In other words, a dog that has never been exposed to fleas will not suffer a reaction on first contact, but may develop an allergic response with subsequent exposure. A tendency to develop some allergies is inherited, and so are more common in certain breeds. Although people typically suffer from "hay fever" that makes them sneeze, eyes itch and nose run, allergic dogs usually develop itchy skin diseases. Effective treatment requires eliminating the allergen that causes the reaction (see ANAPHYLAXIS).
  8. 8. intelligence inside your dog into an online platform with over 21 games for improving his obedience and behavior. Plus you get a huge library of information on how to change specific problem behaviors. It's called: After your dog goes through the modules you will…

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